Number 3905 Robert William Hallworth

 

 

from E-Veritas

3905 Bob Hallworth, died 3rd of January 2016, in Hospice at Saanich Peninsula Hospital on Vancouver Island near Victoria, BC.

After graduating from the Royal Military College in 1958 Bob flew F86 Sabres with 439 Squadron in Europe with the RCAF Air Division. Later Bob joined Air Canada and retired as a B767 captain flying international routes throughout the world. Bob is predeceased by his wife, Rosemarie.

Funeral arrangements to be announced at a later date.

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Peter Kirkham

In my last year of high school my family had moved to Lethbridge,
where my father took over the management of a dairy, for the
Central Alberta Dairy Pool. I went to LCI ( Lethbridge Collegiate Institute).

I , of course, did not know anyone there, but the best curling team in the high school
needed a "lead:; it did not matter if the guy knew anything about curling. I jumped at the chance.
That year that team was winning everything, not from my efforts, mind you.
At one point we went to a curling bonspiel in Taber, a little town not far from Lethbridge.
Bob was the skip of the Taber team. I think we won the bonspiel, but after Bob and I be
came friends.

On the train trip down east, coming to the College for the first time, Bob was on the same
train, making the same journey. We were joined on that trip by Bill Peterson, who came from
Pincher Creek.

After this first encounter, we would travel back to Alberta at Christmas, some times by train,
but once with an RCMP officer, who also came from Taber, and was a friend of Bob's.
In northern Ontario, one time, the RCMP guy was driving, speeding, and we got stopped by the
highway patrol. When the RCMP guy rolled down his window, it was a friend of his who had stopped
us; he said "just slow down, ok?', and let us go.

Yes Bob was aa very smart guy, who, like so many of us from the west, had an "tin ear" when it
came to French, since we never hear it spoken.
His father, was a wheat farmer, who, one year, won the "world wheat king" title. I got a first hand view of this process,
having visited Bob one Christmas. The wheat was spread out on the kitchen table, and the
family spent most of the winter, sorting kernels.  It was a very mind-numbing experience.

When Bob missed his first year we saw less of each other as the years passed, as our paths diverged.
I always had a fond spot in my heart for Bob though. A wonderful product of the west.

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Bill Lynn

I received the following update today from Murray Thom on the passing on January 3rd of Bob Hallworth 439 Squadron. A few days ago I had reported him as very ill.

 I also just received today information that there will be a Remembrance of Bob’s life on Saturday, February 6th at 3:30 p.m. at the BC Aviation Museum, Saanich, near the Victoria International Airport.

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Serge Morin

Bob was a member of 2 sqn, and in third year, his room was directly in front of mine in Haldimand.  He had a most pleasant personality, and please transfer our sincere sympathy to his family.

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William Campbell

Thank you so much for passing along the sad news about Bob Hallworth's passing. I had missed it in e-Veritas.
During my recruit year in 2 Sqn on the top floor of Fort LaSalle Bob's room was directly across the hall from mine. Bob was the first Westerner I had ever met. We became very close friends. I recall he was very proud of his father who had been recently crowned as the "Wheat King". Muriel and I visited he and Audrey in their home near Metz, France, while I was serving in West Germany. Bob was wearing a new scar on the bridge of his nose as a result of being ejected from his aircraft when it went into an outside loop and pressed him against the canopy. He could barely reach the ejection lever. The departing canopy knocked him out and he came to while in his parachute. It was that weekend that Muriel and I were introduced to escargots. Muriel fell in love with them, l did not ever try them again. Unfortunately we did not manage to stay in touch with each other over the years.

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Emil Bizon

Bob was raised in Taber which is in the far south and in Mormon country. His father was a grain farmer of note and was world wheat champion for a time. His mother was of Italian descent- Gina- and he has a sister whom I have not met. His father sold the farm near Taber and bought another near Carmangay which is north of Lethbridge about as far as Taber is east of it. All his schooling was in Taber, not Red Deer. He dropped third year and I do not think it was because of French but, more likely, calculus. I am quite sure he then took Commerce.

 
Bob was raised in Taber which is in the far south and in Mormon country. His father was a grain farmer of note and was world wheat champion for a time. His mother was of Italian descent- Gina- and he has a sister whom I have not met. His father sold the farm near Taber and bought another near Carmangay which is north of Lethbridge about as far as Taber is east of it. All his schooling was in Taber, not Red Deer. He dropped third year and I do not think it was because of French but, more likely, calculus. I am quite sure he then took Commerce.
 
While flying Sabres in Europe he had to bail out and suffered significant injury when the canopy and his body were in the same space. He would not talk about it but Bud Rud is here and knows the story. Bud has not been out to any of our functions here, however, for about two years.
 
Health-wise he was strong and had no illnesses, to my knowlede, until recently, if then. He had a major prostactectomy shortly after I did- maybe 1992- and recovered well from it.  It is possible the big C came back because one can never be too certain about that disease.
 
Needless to say I miss him as do Andrée and our children. He was a good person in all respects.
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I apologise for the quality of this photo but I could only find it in our year book. You cannot see that it's Bob in the front cockpit but I know that it's Bob because I took the photo. I used high speed B&W film with a red filter to emphasize the cloud.
It's iconic because it was a regular feature of our very early days when the instructor would start out with the student, watch his technique through a few landings, tell the student to return to the tarmac where he would climb out, secure the rear seat straps and send the student off to do solo take offs, overshoots and landings. (12,13,o/s in our log books)
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Bill Lynn:

Further to the mentions of ejections in comments re Hallworth by Campbell and Bizon

Bob ejected twice while on 439 Squadron. On 8 April 1960 he ejected after a mid-air with another Sabre near Zweibrucken, presumably during a practice dog fight. On 2 Feb 1961 he ejected near Chalons-sur-Marne due to seized controls, which is probably the incident referred to by Bill and Emil.

I don’t know of any other pilot who survived two Sabre ejections.

(Info per http://www.ejection-history.org.uk/Aircraft_by_Type/Canadair_Sabre.htm and http://www.thisisme.ca/439squadron/TIGER/439album-9.htm)

WIH: On reading your links, I was surprised at the number who ran out of fuel.

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